Cessna 421

Golden Eagle
A Cessna 421B Golden Eagle
Role Light transport
National origin United States of America
Manufacturer Cessna
First flight October 14, 1965
Produced 1967–1985
Developed from Cessna 411

Cessna 421B Golden Eagle with aftermarket RAM modified engines

A Cessna 421B Golden Eagle, front view

A Cessna 421B Golden Eagle

Cessna 421C Golden Eagle, typical pilot’s instrumentation

Cessna 421C Golden Eagle, typical co-pilot’s instrumentation

The Cessna 421 Golden Eagle is a development of the earlier Cessna 411 light, twin-engine personal transport aircraft. The main difference between the two models is that the 421 is pressurized.[1]

[edit] Development

The 421 uses geared Continental GTSIO-520-D engines. The gearing means that rather than the drive shaft being directly connected to the propeller, it drives through a set of reduction gears.[1]

The 421 was first produced in May 1967. The 421A appeared in 1968 and the aircraft was redesigned in 1970 and marketed as the 421B. In 1975 the 421C appeared which featured wet wings, the absence of wing tip fuel tanks and landing gear that was changed from straight-leg to a trailing-link design. Production ended in 1985 after 1901 had been delivered.[1]

The Cessna 421 was first certified on 1 May 1967 and shares a common type certificate with models 401, 402 411, 414 and 425[2]

Some 421s have been modified to accept turboprop engines, making them very similar to the Cessna 425, which itself is a turboprop development of the 421.[citation needed]

[edit] Variants

421
Type approved 1 May 1967, powered by two Continental GTSIO-520-Ds of 375 hp (280 kW) each, maximum take-off weight 6,800 lb (3,084 kg).[2]
421A
Type approved 19 November 1968, powered by two Continental GTSIO-520-Ds of 375 hp (280 kW) each, maximum take-off weight 6,840 lb (3,103 kg).[2]
421B Golden Eagle/Executive Commuter
Eight-seat light passenger transport aircraft. Type approved 28 April 1970, powered by two Continental GTSIO-520-Hs of 375 hp (280 kW) each, maximum take-off weight 7,250 lb (3,289 kg), later models 7,450 lb (3,379 kg).[2]
421C Golden Eagle/Executive Commuter
Light passenger transport aircraft. Type approved 28 October 1975, powered by two Continental GTSIO-520-Ls or Continental GTSIO-520-Ns of 375 hp (280 kW) each, maximum take-off weight 7,450 lb (3,379 kg).[2]

[edit] Military Operators

 Bahamas
 Bolivia
 Côte d’Ivoire
 New Zealand
 Pakistan
 Paraguay
 Philippines
 Rhodesia
  • Rhodesian Air Force – 1
 Sri Lanka
 Turkey

[edit] Specifications (C 421C)

Data from Jane’s All The World’s Aircraft 1976-77 [3]

General characteristics

  • Crew: One or two
  • Capacity: Six passengers
  • Length: 36 ft 9⅝ in (11.09 m)
  • Wingspan: 41 ft 1½ in (12.53 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 5⅜ in (3.49 m)
  • Wing area: 215 ft² (19.97 m²)
  • Empty weight: 4,501 lb (2,041 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 7,450 lb (3,379 kg)
  • Powerplant:Continental GTSIO-520-L turbocharged, fuel injected and geared six-cylinder horizontally-opposed air-cooled piston engine, 375 hp (280 kW) each

Performance

[edit] See also

 

Related development

 

[edit] References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c Demand Media (2009). “The Cessna 421 & 414”. http://www.airliners.net/aircraft-data/stats.main?id=154. Retrieved 2009-11-04. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Federal Aviation Administration (March 2007). “TYPE CERTIFICATE DATA SHEET NO. A7CE Revision 47”. http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library%5CrgMakeModel.nsf/0/28E4C2DA51AFDBDD862572B300534A2F?OpenDocument. Retrieved 2009-11-05. 
  3. ^ Taylor 1976, pp. 272–273.
Bibliography
  • Taylor, John W.R. (editor). Jane’s All The World’s Aircraft 1976-77. London:Jane’s Yearbooks, 1976. ISBN 0 354 00538 3.
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